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Ruchill Branch


Ex-North British Railway Class S (LNER Class J37) 0-6-0 No. 64623 approaches Ruchill Goods Depot on the branch from Possilpark with the Branch Line Society Glasgow North Brake Van Tour on 27th March, 1964. Full details of the railtour can be found here. [David Idle]
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Bowling

Opened: 31st May, 1858.

Bowling Station serves the village of Bowling in West Dunbartonshire. It is situated on the North Clyde Line, 12¼ miles west of Glasgow Queen Street. The station was made famous by a painting by the renowned railway artist, the late Terence Cuneo, who depicted a then-new 'Blue Train' (Class 303) EMU heading west into Bowling, with a steam locomotive, which the electric unit had replaced, in a siding.


Formed of a Pressed Steel AM3 Blue Train (Class 303) 3-car EMU in smart-looking BR blue & grey livery, an eastbound train from Helensburgh to Airdrie speeds through Bowling Station during August 1983. With a few exceptions, only Balloch services stop at Bowling. Note the substantial station building and the signal box, all now demolished. [Eastbank Model Railway Club]

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Craigendoran Lower

Opened: opened 15th May, 1882.

Craigendoran Station serves Craigendoran, east of Helensburgh in Dunbartonshire. It is located on the North Clyde Line, 23 miles west of Glasgow Queen Street. The station formerly consisted of three distinct parts with a total of five platforms, these being Craigendoran Upper, Craigendoran Lower and Craigendoran Pier Stations. The present station consists of only one platform of the former Craigendoran Lower Station. All bar the West Highland Line platforms were electrified during the North Clyde electrification scheme.

Craigendoran is presently served by half-hourly eastbound trains to Glasgow Queen Street westbound to Helensburgh Central.

Wikipedia page.


A westbound Pressed Steel AM3 Blue Train (Class 303) 3-car EMU in BR 'rail blue' approaches Craigendoran during January 1978. This unit carries the 'GG' logo of the Greater Glasgow Passenger Transport Executive (GGPTE). The driving cabs have been rebuilt with flat reinforced glass to give greater protection to drivers. [Eastbank Model Railway Club]

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Craigendoran Junction

Until 1937, Craigendoran had three signal boxes: Craigendoran East, Craigendoran Junction and Craigendoran West. The West box closed on 2nd May, 1937. On 28th March, 1960, Craigendoran East Signal Box was closed, and the remaining Craigendoran Junction Signal Box was renamed Craigendoran. The track layout at Craigendoran Junction was simplified in 1984, and a replacement signal box with an NX control panel was opened on 4th November, 1984. The present layout at the junction consists of a loop, accessible by West Highland Line trains only, and single lines to Helensburgh Upper and Helensburgh Central. The 1984 signal box was closed in 1992, with control passing to Yoker Signalling Centre (IECC), which controls the whole North Clyde Line.

Wikipedia page.


Ex-LNER Class V1 2-6-2T No. 67622 approaches Craigendoran Junction on 8th March, 1958, with an 8-car suburban train for Helensburgh. The train is passing Ardmore Carriage Sidings on the left. [W.S. Sellar]

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Dalmuir

Opened: May 1858.

Dalmuir Station serves the Dalmuir district of Clydebank, West Dunbartonshire, and is a large, five platform station providing interchange between the Argyle Line, the North Clyde Line and the West Highland Line. It is situated close to the Dalmuir drop lock on the Forth & Clyde Canal. It was originally named Dalmuir Park to distinguish it from the nearby Caledonian Railway station at Dalmuir Riverside, and was opened by the Glasgow, Dumbarton and Helensburgh Railway in May 1858.

The station was expanded in 1897 by the North British Railway when it extended the Glasgow, Yoker and Clydebank Railway to Dalmuir from Clydebank. The new line met the older route via Drumchapel at Dalmuir Park Junction, immediately to the west of the original platforms, after passing beneath the former GD&HR line a few yards to the east. There are four through platforms, two on the Yoker line and two on the Singer branch along with a bay platform from the Yoker branch constructed by British Rail in 1979 as part of the Argyle Line improvements. Trains terminating from the Singer branch reverse in a turnback siding to the west of the station just beyond the junction. The two inner platforms link up at the north end of the station, where there were formerly two footbridges - one spanning each pair of lines. However these were dismantled in 2010 after being replaced by a new, fully disabled-accessible bridge with three lifts linking all five platforms. The other station buildings are Portakabin-type structures erected in the early 1980s to replace the original stone ones.

Passenger services are provided by ScotRail on behalf of Strathclyde Partnership for Transport. As befits a junction station with two alternative routes to Glasgow and access to both main stations there, services operate to a wide range of destinations. Westbound, there are two trains per hour to Balloch and two to Helensburgh Central respectively. Services to Helensburgh generally operate non-stop to Dumbarton East, while Balloch trains call at all stations. There are two eastbound trains per hour to Cumbernauld via Yoker and two to Airdrie or Edinburgh Waverley via Queen Street Low Level, and two trains each per hour to Larkhall via Yoker and Whifflet via Singer via Glasgow Central Central Low Level and the Argyle Line.

In addition the station is the first or las) stop for West Highland Line services from Glasgow Queen Street High Level to Oban, and to Mallaig via Fort William. The Highland Sleeper also calls in each direction daily, giving the station a direct link to and from London Euston via the West Coast Main Line.

Wikipedia page.


An English Electric Type 1 (Class 20) takes the line to Westerton and Cowlairs at Dalmuir Station with a train of oil tank wagons from the West Highland Line during June 1968. [Eastbank Model Railway Club]

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Dalreoch

Opened: 15th July, 1850.

Dalreoch Station serves the west end of the town of Dumbarton in West Dunbartonshire. It was opened on 15th July, 1850, by the Caledonian & Dumbartonshire Junction Railway, and is situated 16 miles west of Glasgow Queen Street Station. Dalreoch became a junction with the opening of the Glasgow, Dumbarton & Helensburgh Railway on 28th May, 1858. The western section of the Glasgow, Dumbarton & Helensburgh Railway left the Caledonian & Dumbartonshire Junction Railway at Dalreoch Junction, immediately to the west of Dalreoch Station. Following successive amalgamations, the Glasgow, Dumbarton & Helensburgh Railway became part of the North British Railway, and then part of the London & North Eastern Railway at the 1923 Grouping; however, the Caledonian & Dumbartonshire Joint Railway was purchased jointly by the North British Railway, the Caledonian Railway and the Lanarkshire & Dumbartonshire Railway. Renamed the Dumbarton & Balloch Railway, it remained a joint line at the 1923 Grouping, but its owners were now the London, Midland & Scottish Railway and the London & North Eastern Railway. Services on the Lanarkshire & Dumbartonshire route to Possil via Dalmuir Riverside ended in October 1964 when it fell victim to the 'Beeching Axe'.

Dalreoch Station is currently managed by ScotRail and is served by trains on the North Clyde Line. Eastbound, four trains per hour run to Dalmuir, Glasgow Queen Street and Airdrie; two are limited stop and continue to Bathgate and Edinburgh Waverley. Westbound, trains run to Balloch and Helensburgh Central, each at half-hourly intervals. On Sundays the frequency remains the same on both lines, but trains to and from Balloch run via the Argyle Line to Motherwell via Whifflet and Larkhall via Hamilton. The station has a ticket office and car park with 107 spaces.

Wikipedia page.


An ex-LNER Class V3 2-6-2T departs from Dalreoch Station and takes the Helensburgh line at Dalreoch Junction with the 5.55pm Bridgeton Central to Helensburgh Central train on 2nd June, 1956. The locomotive carries a North British Railway destination board on its smokebox, but it appears to be illegible. [W.A.C. Smith]

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Drumchapel

Opened: May 1890.

Drumchapel Station serves the Blairdardie and Drumchapel districts of Glasgow. It is situated on Garscadden Road, and has a staffed ticket office, a car park with 29 spaces, 10 cycle stands, and a bus terminus. The station is presently managed by ScotRail and is served by trains on the Argyle and North Clyde Lines.

From Monday to Saturday, Drumchapel Station is served before 18.00 by trains from Balloch to Airdrie, and after 18.00 from Balloch to Cumbernauld via Springburn. It is also served by trains from Dalmuir to Whifflet.

Wikipedia page.


Ex-LNER Class V3 2-6-2T No. 67619 enters Drumchapel Station on 8th March, 1958, with a train for Glasgow Queen Street Low Level. [W.S. Sellar]

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Maryhill Park Junction


An English Electric Type 3 (Class 37) passes Maryhill Park Junction with a train for the West Highland line during July 1982. The signal box had been damaged by fire and the junction for the line to Anniesland was later removed, only to be reinstated when trains were extended from Maryhill to Anniesland. [Eastbank Model Railway Club]

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